• Denial Management Software posted an update 2 weeks, 6 days ago

    Statics of Healthcare and Patient Payment Estimator
    Universal health care is a system that provides quality medical services to all citizens. The federal government offers it to everyone regardless of their ability to pay. The sheer cost of providing quality health care makes universal health care a large expense for governments. Most universal health care is funded by general income taxes or payroll taxes. The United States is the only one of the 33 developed countries that doesn’t have universal health care. But its health delivery system does have specific components, such as Medicare, Medicaid, and the Department of Veterans Affairs, that provide universal health care to specific populations. In 2018, health care cost 9.3% of Australia’s gross domestic product. That’s fairly low. The per capita cost was US$5,005, about average for developed countries. There were 42.6% of patients who reported a wait time of more than four weeks to see a specialist. Australia had one of the best infant mortality rates of the compared countries at 3.1%.19. Canada has a national health insurance system.20The government pays for services provided by a private delivery system. Private supplemental insurance pays for vision, dental care, and prescription drugs. Hospitals are publicly funded. They provide free care to all residents regardless of their ability to pay. The government keeps hospitals on a fixed budget to control costs, but reimburses doctors at a fee-for-service rate. In 2018, health care cost 10.7% of Canada’s GDP. The cost per person was US$4,974.18. A whopping 62.8% of patients waited more than four weeks to see a specialist. The infant mortality rate was 4.3%, among the countries compared. France has a social health insurance system that provides care to all legal residents. That includes hospitals, doctors, drugs, and some dental and vision care. It also pays for homeopathy, spa treatments, and nursing home care. Of that, payroll taxes fund 64%, income taxes pay for 16%, and 12% is from tobacco and alcohol taxes.
    In 2018, health care cost 11.2% of GDP. That was US$4,965 per person.18. Half of all patients reported a wait time of more than four weeks to see a specialist. The infant mortality rate was 3.4%.19. These statistics are all in the middle of the pack for developed nations. Germany has a social health insurance program. Everyone must have public health insurance, but those above a certain income can choose private insurance instead. The state-sponsored insurance covers hospitalization, except for meals and accommodation. It also covers rehab for hospital stays, mental health, and addiction. It even covers long-term care. Funding comes from payroll taxes. In 2018, health care cost 11.2% of GDP.21it averaged US$5,986 per person. Both figures are about average. Only 28.1% of patients reported a wait time of more than four weeks to see a specialist. That is among the lowest of the developed countries. In addition, most Germans can get next-day or same-day appointments with general practitioners. The infant mortality rate was 3.1%.19. The country has a social health insurance system for all residents. Coverage is provided by competing private insurance companies. Residents pay premiums up to 8% of their income. The government reimburses them for any higher costs. People can buy supplemental insurance to access better hospitals, doctors, and amenities. In 2018, health care spending was 12.2% of GDP.23 It was USD $7,317 per person.18 Only 27.3% of patients reported a wait time of more than four weeks to see a specialist.9 The infant mortality rate was 3.7%.19
    The United Kingdom has single-payer health care that covers all residents. Visitors receive care for emergencies and infectious diseases. The National Health Service runs hospitals and pays doctors as employees. The government pays 80% of costs through income and payroll taxes. The rest is paid from co-payments and people paying out-of-pocket for NHS services. It pays for all medical care, including some dental and eye care, hospice care, and some long-term care. There are some co-pays for drugs. In 2015, 10.5% of U.K. residents had private insurance for elective medical procedures.